EU Transparency2021-03-29T16:03:47+02:00

ADVOCATING FOR GREATER TRANSPARENCY IN THE EU

WE SHINE A LIGHT ON EU INSTITUTIONS AND DECISION MAKING

WE PROMOTE TRANSPARENCY IN EU DECISION MAKING...

since citizens have the right to know about how decisions are taken
Transparency in EU decision making is essential to ensuring citizens can hold public officials to account and increase citizen participation. We also campaign for stronger rules for lobbying transparency, the opening up of trilogues, as well as better record keeping by all EU institutions.

WE TACKLE THE
ABUSIVE APPLICATION
OF EXCEPTIONS...

because only in limited cases should the EU apply exceptions to access
By using the EU transparency rules (Regulation 1049/2001) we challenge the decisions of EU institutions that limit access to documents, and take further appeals and complaints to the European Ombudsman or Courts.

WE CHALLENGE
PRACTICAL OBSTACLES TO
ACCESS INFORMATION...

so that submitting requests is simple and straightforward for everyone
We challenge the obstacles put in place by EU institutions via appeals and evidence-based advocacy – whether it be for example, to end the obligation to provide a postal address or personal identification to register requests or simply to be able to use email!
EU AGENCIES
TRAVEL EXPENSES
GUIDE ON ACCESS TO
EU DOCUMENTS
COMMISSIONERS’ EXPENSES CAMPAIGN
LITIGATION AT THE
EU LEVEL

OUR LATEST UPDATES ON EU TRANSPARENCY

19Mar 2021

MEPs to vote on Frontex claiming legal costs from transparency activists

Madrid/Brussels, 19 March 2021– Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) in the Budget Control Committee will vote on Monday 22 March 2021 on whether or not Frontex was right to claim €23,700.81 from two transparency activists after they lost an access to documents case at the Court of Justice of the European Union.

9Mar 2021

Call on MEPs to end Secrecy of EU Fishing Controls

Madrid/Brussels, 9 March 2021– MEPs are being urged to vote on 9 March 2021 to end secrecy surrounding the control of fishing by removing a controversial clause that dates from 1993, long before the EU’s transparency norms got adopted.